Monday, 30 June 2014

I am not categorized as the imitator of someone. I like this sense of individuality: Ganpat Bhadke


Recent work by Ganpat Bhadke
I am mystified by Palshikar’s use of colors and themes of Gaitonde says Ganpat Bhadke. But he maintains his individuality and does not merely remain their imitator. He is an explorer of Universe and a meticulous probing mind in the secrets of Universe and its impact on the living beings on planet called Earth. Nature has always been the core of his theme right from the beginning of his painting process. He first mastered the art of landscaping and made a smooth transition from landscapes to portraiture of especially of pilgrims he encountered at Nashik’s religious sites, who move in mass and each of them carry varied expressions and gestures. Starting from Aurangabad, moving on to Nashik, the under-developed areas he moved on to metropolis like Mumbai and then Delhi. He had the liberty to meet masters such as Manjit Bawa, Shanku Chowdhary, Himmat, Shah, Bhushan da, Krishen Khanna, G.R. Santosh and Arpana Caur who had deep impression on him.

His internal vision sharpened as he stayed in urban areas and experienced the difficulties of survival. Peace of nature and hustle-bustle of urban life stirred his mind and he studied how surrounding and environment made deep impact on human life. So, moving from just external beauties of nature and bodily expressions of human, his conscience dived and swam the ocean sub consciousness wherein he colored objects with his own perspective to make it different. He blended expressionism with landscape and portrait art. He presented this work in exhibition named “Human relation’ which was recognized by Lalit Kala Academy.

Later on, Ganpat Bhadke brush with Adivasis, the men much closer to nature than the metropolitans. Their child-like innocence, simplicity and straightforwardness inspired him to paint with freedom and devoid of aggression and ego, projecting simply the happiness and bliss. It resulted into ‘Dissolution Series’, followed by the new emphasis on beauty, gaiety and freedom and his art reached its zenith in the series of works aptly called “Garland of Vision”. In this he used a flower as a symbol for the human form for its innate qualities of simplicity and beauty which remain even in its desiccated and fossilized state. He used diffused color schemes and viscous forms to create a dreamlike imagery with symbolic representation of flora and fauna.

His promotion on next level of understanding and deeper vision could be seen in “Evolving Phases” reflecting his art journey. Abstract art is not easily deciphered by mass. It is only the spread of colors on canvas or intermingled geometric figures.  But in fact it is the color of nature, interpreted reality. Mostly they are the metaphysical ideals that are shapeless and formless.

Visual artists, from the generation have dealt with mysticism or occultism at their core, which cannot be expressed in a particular form than in geometric compositions. Ganpat Bhadke applies this method to present the complexity of nature, show harmonic relation between man and nature, man with other living things and real and mystic. All done and created in classical manner.

Apart from painting, he has diverse interest which lead him to be a part of various medias, including films and animation, where he has directed various animation films for different production houses. He also worked with writer-director Dr. Chandra Prakash Dwivedi in his book publishing projects. He has also tried his hands in publication units. It is a an awesome experience to watch the creations of this well-learned and all rounder artist.

by Pankaja JK
 Art critic & writer:- Art blogazine 2014

 
Ganpat Bhadke  who sums up existential philosophy in the visual triangulation of forms converses with Pankaja JK  revealing his passion of painting and the practical matters.
Ganpat Bhadke at Studio Mumbai

J.K.) When did you first start painting and how did your journey as artist began?


G.B.)Though I loved painting from childhood, my real journey as an artist started in 1985 painting objects during Foundation course in Aurangabad. Being in such an historical place, I tried my at hands at Ajanta and Ellora paintings for sometime. Later on as I came to Nashik for Diploma I developed skill in watercolor style. My journey began in either historic or naturally rich arenas. Here too I was fascinated by natural beauty and religious sites and I started painting that. But as I visited religious sites of ghats and on hills I became interested in nature and expressions of people or pilgrims which aroused me to capture their feature in portraiture and thus one more feature of painting- Portrait became the topic of my interest. Later as my academic path broadened and I came to Mumbai, held exhibitions, my art was recognized and I gained many prestigious awards for my landscapes and portraits.   

J.K.) How would you describe your style?

G.B.) As I mentioned earlier, I tried my hands at every style from simple objective to abstraction. All my styles have been appreciated till now. As I contemplate, it is because the colors in my paintings are transparent like oils. I am basically inspired by nature but many a times abstract paintings develop from the subjective point of view. They are mostly in geometric forms, because if you observe nature you will find that is not formless but has a particular form for each of its element. So do my abstractions have.  

J.K.)  What motivates you to paint?

G.B.) I feel this is an absurd question in my case, because I never deliberated on the topic and decided to make it a target. Anybody or anything inspires me. World is full of mysteries like the cycle and aura of nature, various emotions and feelings of people, bodily and facial gestures, human and animal approaches among themselves and other species around. All such things at any given time or place motivate me to pick the brush and capture them on my canvas. Its like, my canvas awaits and welcomes every minute element to be protagonist of my painting.  


P.K.) Is abstraction a western idea? Why is it a best way of expression in painting?

G.B.) Yes, it is a known fact in art world that Abstract painting is a western concept. But I think Indian beliefs and scriptures too have abstract concepts which were never capture as medium of expression in art. From earlier times we presented just that what is visible and in grasping power. Interpretative comprehension did not matter to us. But Indian philosophy is full of abstract idea. I will just give you one example. A stone is regarded highly as God and given there is some similarity of that stone’s form with the image of God. It secures place in temple and permanently in heart of people. So I think though it was brought in limelight by westerner, it is an Indian concept too. 


P.K.) How do people accept your paintings? Does their opinion have influence on your work?

G.B.) People have accepted me as a painter with difference. As I do not follow the foot steps of well-known artist and develop my own creations in most natural and child-like way my work is never compared to any other artist. I am not categorized as the imitator of someone. I like this sense of individuality. As far as criticism is concerned, I hardly have any negative responses. I do not spend time in brooding over them. And those positive ones of course, boost my spirit.  


J.K.) Art is for business or passion?

G.B.) First a passion and if sold –a business.


P.K.) Which artists inspire you? Can you tell us any specific feature of their paintings that holds your interest? 

G.B.)  Nature is the greatest artist. But in art circle I highly adore painter Palshikar and Gaitonde. Palshikar sir’s use of color is beyond comparison. And I also have high regards for G.S.Gaitonde for his subjects or themes. 

J.K.) What do you think would be the status of your painting 100 years from now?
G.B.) Let me put it as ‘status of Indian Art’ because I am one part of It. Being culturally rich and having great philosophy makes India stand out from the cluster of art. It has a promising future and very soon art world will speak Indian Art language

by Pankaja JK
 
art critic & writer:- Art blogazine 2014
 

Tuesday, 24 June 2014

“Amrita Sher-Gil: The Passionate Quest” NGMA Mumbai


National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi, and the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai, Ministry of Culture, Government of India are happy to inform that a special exhibition, ‘AmritaSher-Gil: The Passionate Quest’, developed by NGMA New Delhi on the occasion of the closing of the birth centenary celebrations of Amrita Sher-Gil (1913-1941) will be inaugurated and thrown open to the public at NGMA Mumbai on the 31st of May 2014. It is for the first time that almost the entire NGMA collection of around 95 works of Amrita Sher-Gil will be showcased at the exhibition, including many paintings that have rarely been displayed before.
Amrita Sher-Gil

The works Amrita Sher-Gill produced during her short but prolific life combined brilliant details from the scenes of everyday life in India, and created a timeless monumentality. In a tragically brief career, Sher-Gil did much to introduce her country to the idea of the free-spirited artist, and to show her people that art could interpret Indian life for Indians

She came to India in 1921, drew inspiration from the exquisite little miniatures of Kangra and frescoes of Ajanta. The figures she drew with expressions on their faces were her own invention. Amrita’s paintings were not mere reproductions of what she saw around her but visions born out of the coordination of colour, design and emotion. Visit to South India inspired her to produce the most remarkable works such as "The Bride’s Toilette", “The Brahmacharis" and "South Indian Villagers going to Market". The Brahmacharis, which was painted in , is a fine example of her understanding of the Hindu faith which is still prevalent in the traditionalist South India. She is remembered for her paintings done just over a period of seven years. But the passion with which she handled the brush and the genius with which she combined her training in the West and her view of the East, made her most popular. The sincerity of her subject and the uses of colours bring to Amrita’s paintings a quality of timelessness. Most of her paintings reflect her love for the country and more importantly her response to the life of its people. She was the youngest among the pioneers of contemporary movement and the most short lived.

The exhibition was inaugurated by Mrs Pheroza Godrej, Chairperson Advisory Committee, NGMA Mumbai in the august presence of Dr Gieve Patel, eminent poet and painter and Ms Yashodhara Dalmia, Curator of the exhibition on 31st May 2014 at 6.00 PM at the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai.
Pheroza Godrej in her inaugural address said “The richness of Amrita Sher-Gil’s visual language and experiments with form and composition have been sensitively analysed by the curator, Yashodhara Dalmia, who has approached the oeuvre from four different perspectives described as Threshold, Icon and Iconolastic, Hungarian Manifestation and Indian Journey. Mrs Pheroza Godrej thanked the curator Yashodhara Dalmia for her perceptive approach to Amrita Sher-Gil’s art. She also expressed her thanks and gratitude to Ms. Manju Singh, Chairperson and members of
Group of Three Girls, Oil on canvas, January 1935

the NGMA New Delhi Advisory Committee for their support in bringing this exhibition to NGMA Mumbai. She also acknowledged the support of the members of the Advisory Committee NGMA Mumbai and the sincere efforts of the entire NGMA, Mumbai team for making this exhibition a great success.
This impressive and arresting collection of her paintings is supplemented by an illuminating display of text and images titled, Remembering Amrita Sher-Gil. This focuses on the artistic genius and mercurial personality of Amrita Sher-Gil, which have a bearing on her paintings. To further contextualise Amrita Sher-Gil’s modernism, an audio-visual highlighting the European art scene in the early 20th century, conceptualised by Ella Datta, is an attraction to this significant show.
Nude Oil on canvas, 1933

Prof Rajeev Lochan Director NGMA New Delhi, who spearheaded the birth centenary celebrations of Amrita Sher-Gil said, “The complexity of Amrita Sher-Gil’s personality and the brilliant versatility of her work invite varied reactions. Viewers remark on the sensuousness of her representations, her sensitivity, her melancholy faces and her intimate projections of a female identity. And indeed all these readings are inescapably true. I am confident that this exhibition will recontextualise Amrita Sher-Gil and her work in our present times

Marking the inauguration of the exhibition here at NGMA Mumbai Shivaprasad Khened Director NGMA Mumbai said “Bold, unconventional, hugely talented and very beautiful – the painter Amrita Sher-Gil is the stuff that legends are made of. Her paintings reveal her training in the Western schools of art, but at the same time, reflect colourfully her love for India and her response to the life of its people”.

Mapping Amrita Sher-Gil’s genius, Yashodhara Dalmia said, “her fervent journey resulted in a successful melding of Eastern and Western traditions. This paved the way for modernism in Indian art and influenced generations of artists. Sher-Gil's immense achievement is commemorated in this exhibition which also marks her birth centenary year. The works map the journey from the genesis of her art to its triumphant culmination in the last period. This consists of the essential conditions of her paintings which can be traced to the training at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, her return to India in 1934, the subsequent experiments in her work resulting from the exposure to Ajanta and Ellora and Indian miniatures as well as her last paintings which point towards another fruitful breakthrough. As Sher-Gil's attempts at modernity and loosening the shackles of academism became increasingly successful, she was to make iconic works which created a distinctive interweaving of Eastern and Western art.

“Amrita Sher-Gil flashed through the Indian artistic horizon like an incandescent meteor. Her place in the trajectory of Indian modern art is unquestionably pre eminent. Her aesthetic sensibility shows not surprisingly a blend of European and Indian elements. Her command over handling of oil medium and use of colour, as well as her vigorous brushwork and strong feeling for composition, all go towards giving a dazzling quality to her genius. Amrita Sher-Gil was already a legend as a young woman painter in the early thirties of the last century in the art world of India. This exhibition at NGMA Mumbai is accompanied by the release of a comprehensive catalogue with a lead essay by YashodharaDalmia.

The exhibition will be on view for public from 1.06.2014 to 30.06.2014 from 11 am – 6 PM, for a period of one month. (Except on Mondays and National holidays).


PRESS RELEASE
National Gallery of Modern Art
Sir Cowasji Jehangir Public Hall,
M G Road Mumbai 400032


copyright NGMA

Monday, 23 June 2014

ART TALK SHOW at Art Gate Gallery

Do come...26th June. ART TALK : Kajal Gaitonde at 4:00 to 5.00pm and Prashant Hirlekar at 5pm to 6pm Art Gate Gallery, Churchgate Mumbai
Art Gate Gallery can be contacted at:022 4213 8855
or emailed at artgate.sc@gmail.com

Tuesday, 17 June 2014

18th June SAVE DATE: ART TALK : Archana Mishra at 4:30pm and Prakash Waghmare at 6pm Art Gate Gallery, Churchgate Mumbai

Green Palette Group show

18th June SAVE DATE: ART TALK : Archana Mishra at 4:30pm and Prakash Waghmare at 6pm Art gate gallery, churchgate Mumbai

Wednesday, 11 June 2014

PRESS RELEASE : by Green Palette Group show

Date: April 18 – 26, June 2014 Venue: Art Gate Gallery, Churchgate, Mumbai

18th June : ART TALK : Chief Guest Speech

Archana Mishra : 4:30pm 5:30pm 
Creative Expressions ( Hindi) 

Prakash Waghmare : 6pm: 7pm 
Art Walk ( Marathi)

Date: April 18 – 26, June 2014 Venue: Art Gate Gallery, Churchgate, Mumbai

Byline: The Art Gate Gallery hosts an exhibition of contemporary paintings by Maharashtra  based Artist
  • Nitin Vinchure
  • Madhav Joshi 
  • Vikas Malhara  
  • Vijai Jain
  • Ashok Hinge
  • Raju Baviskar
( Group of artist Green Palette )

About the exhibition:in this group show  ‘Green Palette’ is a revival of freshness of Romanticism. As its name suggests, it is about taking the world back into nature holding on the social reality as well. The artists involved in this exhibition have creations depicting man’s mystic relationship with nature. There is also a revolutionary energy flowing in Green Palette which deliberately transforms our perception of the world. Like, artist Ashok Hinge, who uses natural and man-made elements in nature to simplify the concept of completeness of world around us. Nature is a source of subject and image; it’s a refuge from the artificial constructs of civilization. Green Palette aims at retrieving clean and green environment world wide. Every artists participating in this exhibition contributes in one form or the other in increasing Environmental awareness and spreading greener. It would be a great delight to feel and experience the revival of Romanticism in art after a long time on the group show ‘Green Palette’ and also be a part of spreading the message-  Gear up to make Globe Green again.   

About the artist’s work and artist:

Nitin Vinchure displays classic interpretation of all creations in this Universe with his imagination. He logical explains his imagination cum interpretation saying that, before any creation, there was only the Mahashunya or Nix. But Shakti or Sheerenrgy existed ...

Vijai Jain creations are perfect examples of symbolic creations. For him Solar System, Earth, Soil, Water, Birds, trees and his alkies’- the human beings, all the gleans are symbols surrounding us. Life proceeds enjoying the process of decoding the meaning these gleans...  

Madhav Joshi desires to express the "inexpressible"--the infinite--through the available resources of colors and forms. He too is completely awed by nature. He applauds the Nature’s capacity as a unified whole. The realistic creations are devoid of scientific or rationalist associations.
Vikas Malhara. I feel his statement suggests that nothing is static and permanently dominant in Life. For him Life is a kaleidoscope of happiness and sorrow, of brightness and darkness, of the beautiful and the ugly, of the form and the formless, of the seen and the unseen. They interplay, dominate by turns, changing patterns and meanings along the way.

Raju Baviskar, social realism is subordinate to imaginative suggestion, and most importantly the ideals suggested by his creations based on honest, hard working villager, their struggle round the clock for survival all these have simplicity and innocence, drawn with deep thinking of the reflections that he has seen in their eyes and expressions on their faces. The bodies are worn out and yet have hopes of something good to happen.

Ashok Hinge manages at his best to unify symbolism and realism. His creations are inspired by the God-made and Man-made elements, which is an attempt by the artist to metaphorically simplify the universe. For him man-made creations like temples as shown in ‘Surya Mandir’ is as important as lush green surroundings, mystical landscapes.     

The artist lives and works in Mumbai. 

Exhibition details: April 18 – 26 (11.00 am to 7.00 pm) and April 21 from 11.00 am – 3.00 pm Art Gate Gallery 1st Floor (above Satyam Collection) Chheda Sadan 115, J Tata Road Churchgate Mumbai, India

- by Pankaja JK
 

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Art Talk at Art Gate Gallery


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18th June SAVE DATE: ART TALK : Archana Mishra at 4:30pm and Prakash Waghmare at 6pm Art gate gallery, churchgate Mumbai
Art Gate Gallery can be contacted at:022 4213 8855
or emailed at artgate.sc@gmail.com

(Note : This PRESS RELEASE for all Indian news paper and Media, leading PR Agency  and online social media, please share )

Nature is a source of subject and image; it’s a refuge from the artificial constructs of civilization

‘Green Palette’ is a revival of freshness of Romanticism. As its name suggests, it is about taking the world back into nature holding on the social reality as well. The artists involved in this exhibition have creations depicting man’s mystic relationship with nature. There is also a revolutionary energy flowing in Green Palette which deliberately transforms our perception of the world. Like, artist Ashok Hinge, who uses natural and man-made elements in nature to simplify the concept of completeness of world around us. Nature is a source of subject and image; it’s a refuge from the artificial constructs of civilization. Green Palette aims at retrieving clean and green environment world wide. Every artists participating in this exhibition contributes in one form or the other in increasing Environmental awareness and spreading greener
Recent work by Nitin Vinchure

Imagination is the core of Green Palette artists. Each creation is shaped by imagination. It is vibrantly active power with vision of reality. It’s like an ‘intellectual intuition’ uniting reasoning and feeling, leading to synthesis of different and opposite worlds of unseen power of nature and its physical appearance. Nitin Vinchure displays classic interpretation of all creations in this Universe with his imagination. He logical explains his imagination cum interpretation saying that, before any creation, there was only the Mahashunya or Nix. But Shakti or Sheerenrgy existed. Later on arose a desire to create, materialize and multiply; which in turn was made possible by Shakti or Shreenergy and it manifested in innumerable forms. The positive energy of this Shakti negates negative energy and facilitates expression of desire, passion, beauty, warmth, courage, spontaneity and the power to transform. Color is one of the forms of this Sheerenergy. Therefore his paintings in various hues/ colors express a flow and spontaneity of all creations.  He prefers to go abstract and symbolize the forms in universe. For him abstraction of form has wider scope of expressing the inexpressible, there is a depth of insight. With Shakti as a significant theme, he creates abstract paintings. If  we observe  crisscross strokes meticulously in his paintings, we realize that these crisscross strokes are nothing but random flow of Sheerenergy enabling the vital principle or animating force within living things have momentum. Very often he uses water colors to paint his abstractions.

Symbolism also has a lot of importance for these artists. Through it they enable us to read nature as a system of symbols. They try to unravel the meaning of gleans and reveal the positive impact on our lives. Truly, Symbols are the human artistic correlatives of nature's symbolic language; a visible symbol adequately represents an abstract idea.  Artist
Vijai Jain creations are perfect examples of symbolic creations. For him Solar System, Earth, Soil, Water, Birds, trees and his alkies’- the human beings, all the gleans are symbols surrounding us. Life proceeds enjoying the process of decoding the meaning these gleans. And being one of these he believes that he surely has some role in this vastly scattered world. Spontaneous creation is one of the characteristic of nature that attracts man’s thoughtful attention.  He tells us that his world is confined in symbols of nature which are water, paper, canvas and colors. Flowing in the course of water these colors get a form and infiltrate on paper, thus completing the circle of his creation. To be the witness of all this process i.e. to be one of the representatives of nature is truly a mesmerizing experience. And for him his every creation is the evidence of this experience. 
   
Like him even artist Madhav Joshi desires to express the "inexpressible"--the infinite--through the available resources of colors and forms. He too is completely awed by nature. He applauds the Nature’s capacity as a unified whole. The realistic creations are devoid of scientific or rationalist associations. He celebrates the raw form of nature in his paintings because he feels it (Nature) has enormous effect on him. Like seasonal swings, he experiences changes in his thoughts and mood and this he largely credits to variations in nature due to impact of changing seasons. These changes perk up and exhilarate us. It vitalizes and creates positive energy. He prefers to paint nature, get inspired by it and also divulge its depth and intensity to admirers.
   
Recent work by Vikas Malhara

 Artists of Green Palette also seem give greater emphasis on importance of intuition; instincts, and feelings along with activity of the imagination. Greater attention is given to emotions as a necessary supplement to purely logical reason. When this emphasis is applied to the creation, a very important shift of focus occurs; there is a spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings. It is illumination of the world within.  This interior journey and the development of the self recur as subject material for artist Vikas Malhara. I feel his statement suggests that nothing is static and permanently dominant in Life. For him Life is a kaleidoscope of happiness and sorrow, of brightness and darkness, of the beautiful and the ugly, of the form and the formless, of the seen and the unseen. They interplay, dominate by turns, changing patterns and meanings along the way. If this is the truth, than he wonders what would be its essence. The fact that perfection of Life is hard to define, is does not bother him and he does not intend to know the solution for perfection, instead, he is determined to paint the token appearance and emotional outburst in life. Because he knows that whatever he has depicted may just be a speculation but it does exists and adds to meaning of existence therefore it needs to be acknowledged, appreciated.
   
Recent work by Raju Baviskar

Though these artists interpret things through their own emotions, and these emotions also  included social and political consciousness. Like, for artist Raju Baviskar, social realism is subordinate to imaginative suggestion, and most importantly the ideals suggested by his creations based on honest, hard working villager, their struggle round the clock for survival all these have simplicity and innocence, drawn with deep thinking of the reflections that he has seen in their eyes and expressions on their faces. The bodies are worn out and yet have hopes of something good to happen.
   
Ashok Hinge manages at his best to unify symbolism and realism. His creations are inspired by the God-made and Man-made elements, which is an attempt by the artist to metaphorically simplify the universe. For him man-made creations like temples as shown in ‘Surya Mandir’ is as important as lush green surroundings, mystical landscapes. The paintings are attractive in themes and colors as well. For a Universe to be complete in itself there should be a beauty and captors of beauty. So instinctively I feel he paints both- nature as self emerged beauty and man-made things that represent man as captor, who vividly tries to imitate and capture the power and beauty of nature through his creations.
   

In brief, It would be a great delight to feel and experience the revival of Romanticism in art after a long time on the group show ‘Green Palette’ and also be a part of spreading the message-  Gear up to make Globe Green again.    

- by Pankaja JK
  art critic & writer:- Art blogazine 2014



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